How to write good

From George L. Trigg, William Safire, and others

  • Consult the dictionery to avoid mispelings.
  • Avoid run-on sentences they are hard to read.
  • Verbs has to agree in number with their subjects.
  • No sentence fragments.
  • Make sure each pronoun agrees with their antecedent.
  • Just between you and I, the case of pronouns is important.
  • In letters essays and reports use commas to separate items in a series.
  • Avoid commas, that are not necessary.
  • Parenthetical words however should be enclosed in commas.
  • A writer must not shift your point of view in mid-sentence.
  • Use parallel construction not only to be concise but also clarify.
  • Don’t use no double negatives.
  • If I’ve told you once, I’ve told you a thousand times: Resist hyperbole.
  • Its important to use apostrophes right in everybodys writing.
  • Don't abbrev.
  • Remember to hyphenate two or more word modifiers that precede the words they modify.
  • Avoid trendy locutions that sound flaky.
  • In the case of a report, check to see that jargonwise, it's A-OK.
  • Writing carefully, dangling participles should not be used.
  • Never use a long word when a diminutive one will do.
  • Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.
  • Mixed metaphors are a pain in the neck and ought to be weeded out. Don’t verb nouns.
  • Never, ever use repetitive redundancies.
  • In my opinion, I think that an author when he or she is writing should definitely not get into the habit of making use of too many unnecessary words that he or she does not really need in order to put his or her message across.
  • It behooves us to avoid archaisms.
  • Also, avoid awkward or affected alliteration.
  • Last but not least, avoid clichés like the plague.